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Welcome to the GrammarBook.com blog, where you’ll find a wealth of information about grammar and writing in American English. Bookmark this page for quick and easy access to our most current newsletter as well as recent articles. You can also search for your subject of interest or choose from our popular grammar and punctuation categories.

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What Is a Phrase?

Posted on Monday, December 6, 2021, at 6:00 am

Some writers and speakers of American English may have a basic understanding of what a phrase is but may not always be able to define one or identify it in a sentence. In today's post, we'll further explore and explain what a phrase is. How Do You Define a Phrase? A phrase is a sequence …

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Efficacy or Efficiency: Do You Know the Difference?

Posted on Friday, December 3, 2021, at 6:00 am

The words efficacy and efficiency are so similar in how they are spelled, pronounced, and used that they can be confused for each other. There is a difference, though. If you've ever wondered how to distinguish efficacy from efficiency, we'll leave you with a greater understanding in today's post. The Meaning of the Word Efficacy …

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Present Progressive Tense

Posted on Wednesday, December 1, 2021, at 6:00 am

English uses the concept of tense to communicate an action's place in time. For example, in the sentence James threw the ball to first base, the infinitive verb “to throw” is written in the past tense to let us know that this action occurred in the past as opposed to the present or the future. …

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What Is a Compound Sentence?

Posted on Monday, November 29, 2021, at 6:00 am

You might vaguely recall learning about compound sentences at some point earlier in your education. There's also a chance a refresher may help, because review and practice are good for remembering grammatical guidelines. In this post we'll revisit what a compound sentence is and how it is formed. How Do We Create a Compound Sentence? …

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Podium vs. Lectern vs. Pulpit: What Are the Differences?

Posted on Friday, November 26, 2021, at 6:00 am

Let's say you need to stand and deliver a speech tonight. Will you be behind the podium, lectern, or pulpit? Most of us have heard these words, and we generally understand they relate to public speaking. However, some of us might be uncertain about the distinctions among a podium, a lectern, and a pulpit. We'll …

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Is It Associate Degree or Associate’s Degree?

Posted on Wednesday, November 24, 2021, at 6:00 am

American English is replete with style questions and details. One item that can remain elusive for those seeking consistency in their writing is the treatment of academic degrees. If you complete your education at a junior college, have you earned an associate degree—or an associate’s degree? Let’s discuss that further and arrive at direction you …

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Imply vs. Infer: What Do They Mean?

Posted on Monday, November 22, 2021, at 6:00 am

The words imply and infer are related. They are also often used as synonyms or incorrectly swapped to mean the other thing. Today we'll help clear confusion concerning these two words. The Difference Between Imply and Infer To imply something means to suggest it indirectly. It's a way of giving information that allows another person …

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A While vs. Awhile: Do You Know the Difference?

Posted on Friday, November 19, 2021, at 6:00 am

A while and awhile both sound the same when spoken aloud, leading some to think that the two are the same or that one is a misspelling of the other. The two constructions—one as a two-word phrase and the other as a single word—mean different things. In today's post, we will explain the difference so …

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Cultural Identity

Posted on Wednesday, November 17, 2021, at 6:00 am

The last couple of years have seen a greater emphasis on how we refer to and write about cultural identity in a wonderfully diverse country such as the U.S. In this discussion, we'll share some current style guidance you can consider. When we seek reinforcement for certain style items at GrammarBook.com, we most often refer …

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Anymore or Any More: Which One Is Correct?

Posted on Monday, November 15, 2021, at 6:00 am

When our favorite football team is losing often, do we write that we can't handle any more losses by them—or that we can't handle anymore losses by them? We might get confused about whether to use one word or two when we're expressing such an idea in American English. The two treatments (any more and …

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