Grammar GrammarBook.com |
The Blue Book of Grammar and Punctuation

Category: Adjectives and Adverbs

Loose vs. Lose: What You Need to Know

Posted on Monday, May 3, 2021, at 6:00 am

Although they may have nearly identical spellings, loose and lose have different pronunciations and entirely separate meanings. In today's post, we will break down the meaning and usage of each word. The Meaning of Loose Loose is an adjective that means "not tight" or "not contained." Here are a few examples of loose being used …

Read More

Threw vs. Through: What’s the Difference?

Posted on Friday, April 30, 2021, at 6:00 am

Threw and through are two words that sound exactly the same (making them homonyms), but with completely different meanings. That makes them easy to tell apart, once you know the distinctions. In today's post we will explore the meaning of each, give you some examples, and quiz you on the difference. Ready to get started? …

Read More

Should You Say These Ones or Those Ones?

Posted on Monday, April 26, 2021, at 6:00 am

When assessing the grammatical validity of these ones and those ones, you will probably run into a few schools of thought. Opinions often branch into one of three areas: Both are correct. Neither is correct. These ones is incorrect, but those ones can be acceptable. Who has it right? And more important, which (if either) …

Read More

First vs. Firstly: When to Use Each One

Posted on Friday, April 23, 2021, at 6:00 am

Perhaps you have seen the words first and firstly in sentences and wondered which one is correct—or if firstly is even a real word. If so, today's post can help. First Things Firstly As a starting point, let's note that both first and firstly are technically correct in a grammatical sense. That means you can …

Read More

Is It Gray or Grey? Same Color, Different Spelling

Posted on Monday, April 5, 2021, at 9:00 am

As much as we love the English language, we have to admit it can be a little confusing sometimes. It includes words with nearly identical spellings but entirely different meanings. In other cases, as we'll see in a moment, a single word can be spelled in more than one way. Have you ever asked yourself …

Read More

Apart vs. A Part: Do You Know the Difference?

Posted on Monday, March 29, 2021, at 9:00 am

There are some aspects of American English that can be fairly described as "confusing." That's certainly the case when one word can be separated into two and result in a different meaning. Even native speakers of American English can be puzzled by the difference between apart (one word) and a part (two words). Do you …

Read More

Anytime vs. Any Time: Which Is Correct?

Posted on Monday, March 15, 2021, at 9:00 am

This question comes up often, and for good reason. You frequently see both anytime and any time used in written sentences, and when spoken, they sound the same. Because the pause that would go between the two-word version is passed over, it's tough to tell if it should be there in the first place. So, …

Read More

Continually vs. Continuously

Posted on Wednesday, March 10, 2021, at 6:00 am

Writers and speakers of English use the verb continue to communicate the idea of something's going or keeping on, as in "We hope the good weather continues." The concept of the English word continue comes from the Latin root continuāre, meaning "to join together or connect, to make all one." We further understand the idea …

Read More

Farther vs. Further

Posted on Friday, February 12, 2021, at 9:00 am

Few sets of words stump speakers and writers of American English as much as farther and further do. In this post we'll examine the correct uses for each word. One reason farther and further are difficult to distinguish is that both mean something close to "beyond." However, there is a big difference. Farther generally refers …

Read More

Past or Passed: Which Word Is Correct?

Posted on Monday, February 8, 2021, at 9:00 am

The past is many things—but it’s not the same as passed. If you ever find yourself struggling with the grammatical difference between the two, you aren’t alone. They sound identical when spoken aloud and have somewhat related definitions. However, they do have different meanings, and that can help you understand when each word should be …

Read More

1 2 3 9