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The Blue Book of Grammar and Punctuation

Liter or Litre? Which Spelling Is Correct?

Posted on Monday, October 24, 2022, at 6:00 am

Let's say you want to buy some gasoline or maybe a bottle of water. And as it turns out, you're also partial to the metric system. Should you consider your purchase in measurements of litres or liters? Which spelling is the correct one? Let's answer that. What Are Litres and Liters? We can begin by …

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Ergative Verbs: Usage and Examples

Posted on Wednesday, October 19, 2022, at 6:00 am

We know that verbs are words that describe a mental or physical action, a state of being, or an occurrence. We also understand that they relate to a subject that is performing the action. Examples Riva writes stories. Pietro mows the lawn. Ijo laughed. The rain fell. In each example, we have a subject noun …

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Is It Lifes or Lives? Which Word Is Correct?

Posted on Monday, October 17, 2022, at 6:00 am

Many modern-day philosophers (along with thousands of social media influencers) will tell you to enjoy each day because you only live once. But what would happen, grammatically speaking, if you could have more than one life? How would you spell the plural of life correctly? In other words, is it correct to write lifes or …

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Interrogative Sentences: Usage and Examples

Posted on Wednesday, October 12, 2022, at 6:00 am

The English language includes four types of sentences: declarative, interrogative, exclamatory, and imperative. This discussion will focus on interrogative sentences. What Is an Interrogative Sentence? A declarative sentence "declares" something (e.g., facts, thoughts, opinions), an exclamatory sentence imparts a strong expression or emotion, and an imperative sentence issues a command. An interrogative sentence asks a …

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Freshman or Freshmen: Which Spelling Is Correct?

Posted on Monday, October 10, 2022, at 6:00 am

What do you call someone who has just entered their first year of high school or college? It's easy to confuse the words freshman and freshmen. They are spelled almost identically, and it's easy to miss the difference sometimes when we hear them spoken aloud. So how can we tell freshman and freshmen apart? Let's …

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Subjective Case: Usage and Examples

Posted on Wednesday, October 5, 2022, at 6:00 am

Case in English grammar involves the forms that nouns and pronouns take to indicate their function. The three cases in English are subjective, objective, and possessive. In this discussion, we'll review the subjective case. What Is the Subjective Case? The subjective case is the case we use for a noun or a pronoun that is …

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Gage vs. Gauge: Is There a Difference?

Posted on Monday, October 3, 2022, at 6:00 am

Do you know the difference between the words gauge and gage? Is there a difference at all? Is one just a misspelling of the other? If you've ever wondered, this discussion will help to clear things up. The Meaning of Gauge To establish the difference between gage and gauge, we should note that, at least …

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Exclamatory Sentences: Usage and Examples

Posted on Wednesday, September 28, 2022, at 6:00 am

The English language includes four types of sentences: declarative, interrogative, exclamatory, and imperative. This discussion will focus on exclamatory sentences. What Is an Exclamatory Sentence? A declarative sentence “declares” something (e.g., facts, thoughts, opinions), an interrogative sentence asks a question, and an imperative sentence issues a command. An exclamatory sentence imparts a strong expression or …

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Everything or Every Thing: What’s the Difference?

Posted on Monday, September 26, 2022, at 6:00 am

If you've been scouring the internet to find the meaning of everything (the word, not life in general), this might be the post you've been searching for. That's because everything co-exists with every thing, and as a precise and eloquent writer, you want to know the difference. Do the two versions have separate meanings, and …

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What Is a Homophone? (Examples and Usage)

Posted on Wednesday, September 21, 2022, at 6:00 am

There's a chance that at some point in your communication in English, you've read or written a word that sounds like the right one when spoken but is misspelled in print. One such example is the use of "you're" when the context means "your" (or vice versa). This common tendency is the result of what …

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