Me Either vs. Me Neither: Which Is Better?

You have probably come across the phrases me either and me neither in both writing and conversation. Have you ever wondered which is correct? Let’s look at the grammar behind these expressions.

Note that unlike pairs such as either vs. neither, these two phrases don’t have precise meanings. Although widely used, they are idiomatic as opposed to formal constructions of American English.

Me Either vs. Me Neither: Considering Two Poor Grammatical Choices

Both me either and me neither mean approximately the same thing, but neither is grammatically precise. To understand why, we’ll consider how they are often expressed.

Person 1: “I don’t feel like going to work today.”
Person 2: “Me either” (or “Me neither”).

Even though the wording is different, saying either or neither in this context will not change the meaning. The second person is simply agreeing that they also do not feel like working.

American English offers more-grammatical ways to respond. In our example, Person 2 could say one of the following:

“I do not want to go to work either.”
“Nor do I.”
“I also do not feel like working.”

The last response, although correct, may feel stilted to some native English speakers. If so, that may explain why phrases such as me either remain so prevalent, which brings us back to our original question:

Which Is Better: Me Either or Me Neither?

Although we would discourage the habit of using these phrases, our position is that me either is the better choice because either can be used inclusively. For example, you could say either hot fudge or caramel is a great choice if you were agreeing with someone’s opinions. Neither, on the other hand, is a negative word. Changing the statement to neither hot fudge nor caramel is a great choice makes it exclusive rather than inclusive.

When we say me either, we are agreeing with another person and including ourselves in their point of view. The phrase me either as a shortened version of I don’t think so, either or I also don’t think that (or want that) becomes the stronger option.

Me Either vs. Me Neither: Why These Phrases Matter

If most people understand us when we say me either or me neither, does it matter that we are not grammatically accurate? The answer lies in our own perspective. Although we might not be corrected for using these phrases, choosing to be more precise can promote greater grammar in communication; it can likewise enhance others’ sense of our refinement and professionalism.

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1 Comment on Me Either vs. Me Neither: Which Is Better?

One response to “Me Either vs. Me Neither: Which Is Better?”

  1. Jeanine DrJazz Normand says:

    Another popular response is “same here,” meaning, “I feel the same way.”
    It’s short and a lot less ambiguous than either/neither.
    I grew up saying “Nor do I.”

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